PRESCRIP-TEC

PRESCRIP-TEC

Contributing to effective and innovative cervical cancer screening, including direct treatment for women in resource-poor or hard-to-reach settings in the world. Research
Cervical cancer is a major public health problem, with annually more than 500.000 women worldwide diagnosed with this disease. With the Prevention and Screening Innovation Project towards Elimination of Cervical Cancer (PRESCRIP-TEC) we contribute to effective and innovative cervical cancer screening, including direct treatment for women in resource-poor or hard-to-reach settings in the world.

With PRESCRIP-TEC we conduct implementation research in four countries over three continents: Bangladesh and India in Asia, Uganda in Africa, and Slovakia in Eastern Europe. We will improve existing screening protocols in the four countries. In this research universities, cancer institutes and non-governmental organisations from these countries collaborate with the University Medical Center Groningen and the Female Cancer Foundation in the Netherlands.

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Improving coverage of cervical cancer screening

We study and address the barriers and facilitators of providing state-of-the-art community-based screening, treatment, and follow-up programme for cervical cancer in selected settings in Bangladesh, India, Uganda, and Slovak Republic. We measure coverage and uptake in relation to availability, accessibility, acceptability, quality and cost-effectiveness, and options for scaling up. The implementation research will focus on best ways to increase participation and compliance in cervical cancer screening (on the beneficiaries’ side) and improve implementation fidelity (on the providers’ side).

We will use an artificial intelligence decision support systems (AI-DSS) in gynaecological examination. The use of artificial intelligence built into mobile devices offers high quality diagnosis in resource-poor settings. Inter-observer variation in Visual Inspection of the cervix with Acetic acid (VIA) will be reduced, especially when health workers with lower levels of training are involved in the screening process.